Skip to main content

Knocker - up




Mary Smith earned sixpence a week shooting dried peas at sleeping workers windows.
A Knocker-up (sometimes known as a knocker-upper) was a profession in England and Ireland that started during and lasted well into the Industrial Revolution and at least as late as the 1920s, before alarm clocks were affordable or reliable. A knocker-up’s job was to rouse sleeping people so they could get to work on time.
The knocker-up used a truncheon or short, heavy stick to knock on the clients’ doors or a long and light stick, often made of bamboo, to reach windows on higher floors. Some of them used pea-shooters. In return, the knocker-up would be paid a few pence a week. The knocker-up would not leave a client’s window until sure that the client had been awoken.
There were large numbers of people carrying out the job, especially in larger industrial towns such as Manchester. Generally the job was carried out by elderly men and women but sometimes police constables supplemented their pay by performing the task during early morning patrols.
Photograph from Philip Davies’ Lost London: 1870 - 1945.


    Comments

    Popular posts from this blog

    False opinions are like false money

    False opinions are like false money, manufactured first of all by evil men and thereafter circulated by honest people who perpetuate the crime without knowing what they are doing.


     ~ Joseph De Maistre




    What are SOP or Standard operating procedures?

    I wear many turbans, serving as a teacher, consultant and advisor to many organisations most of whom are quite sincere in their efforts to improve performance and profitability. 
    Sincerity is key for success, as are the attitudes, skills and knowledge, of people. Yet organisations fail to succeed primarily because of a lack of good and relevant management systems.
    Good or bad, every functioning organisation evolves a culture a system and a way of doing things. 
    Good systems are well thought out and are relevant. They delight customers, improve morale and helps the bottom line. Customers are usually delighted by high quality of products and services, and prompt deliveries.
    Their design is robust and effective, preventing problems and facilitating rapid correction with minimum heartache and headache. 
    Bad systems on the other hand lead to bottlenecks and paralysis, caused by too much centralising of work or a large lumbering bureaucracy.  
    Centralising occurs when organisations and systems r…

    Freedom and Security

    "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." 
     - Benjamin Franklin